Silicone Pads Make a Lovely Sound

Now that the control buttons are in the circuit, I’ve tamed the clanking noise of the Robotic Glockenspiel! Hear it in this YouTube video.

In an earlier post I mentioned that I’d used a tube of silicone to put a drop of silicone on each solenoid, to reduce the loud ‘clank’ when the solenoid strikes the chime. I found out that a drop of silicone is way too much: the chimes hardly sounded at all.

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The First Switch is In

Since my last post about the glockenspiel, I’ve been taking a vacation from my vacation (aka working). Today I turned back to the glockenspiel and wired up the first of the 5 lighted switches.

The hardware is lighted buttons from Sparkfun in various colors, some 4-wire phone cable I bought years ago, and 4-conductor 0.1″ connectors. The heat-shrink tubing keeps the 5 pins of the button from shorting to each other. Two wires run the LED, and the other three make up the button (common, normally open, and the unused normally closed).

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Design Thinking via the Robotic Glockenspiel Project

Now that the glockenspiel is working and in a case, this post is about what I’ve learned about Design Thinking through my Robotic Glockenspiel project.

Caveat: since I didn’t apply formal Design Thinking to the project, I’m going to be shamelessly revisionistic in order to talk about how the project would have been better via Design Thinking.

The Design Thinking steps we use at work are:

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Gluing the Glockenspiel Box

Now that the glockenspiel plays a number of Christmas carols, it’s time to put it in a box.

After a pile of routing I’m now nailing and gluing the Robotic Glockenspiel box together.  Since this is a first prototype (the flat chime harp is too large to be practical), I’ve made the box sides from 3/4″ x 6″ “white wood” (fir or pine) instead of hardwoods, and made no attempt to conceal the nails.

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Robotic Glockenspiel Now Plays 17 Carols

In my previous post, the robotic glockenspiel played its first tune. This post is an update on transcribing more tunes.

I’ve been busily transcribing public domain Christmas carols from “The Oxford Book of Carols” and other sources of public domain carols, so the glockenspiel has more material to play. All the carols are checked into the SD folder of the Robotic Glockenspiel Git repository, and are part of that open source project.

In other news, I bought this edge guide for my router, so now I can cut the grooves that will hold the base of the glockenspiel.  Next I need to learn how to make rabbet joints, so I can put the glockenspiel box together.

My next post is about crafting the cabinet for the glockenspiel.