Category Archives: Making

Collaboration is not Part of Making; it’s the Heart of Making

This post is about what I’ve learned about Making through the Robotic Glockenspiel project.

Even at the beginning of the project, I was “standing on the shoulders of giants“:

As I learned things, I’d document them for others:

  • I blogged at major points in the project. I could have blogged more frequently.
  • I tweeted synopses of the blog entries, to point to the blog
  • I made YouTube videos from the very start, of the little soldering projects I built to relearn how to solder
  •  Once the software was (mostly) working, I put as much as I could think of on GitHub:
    • my Glockenspiel Arduino sketch
    • my Midi file reading library
    • my SD-card simple persistent settings library
    • The circuit diagram, in Fritzing format
    • the Bill of Materials (parts list)
    • the public domain MIDI files of the Christmas carols, as well as the Aria Maestosa source files for the carols.

Sharing shaped my thinking and the structure of the project:

  • Blogging made me imagine what someone like me would like to know about robotic instruments and glockenspiel construction.
  • Making YouTube videos made me think about how the project demos well or badly, and pulled me out of the technical bits into the user experience.  Trying to make a video of the glockenspiel playing showed me how unacceptably loud it was.
  • Tweeting made me think about how to get the word out about what I’d done so far, and what media to use to connect with like-minded people.
  • Open-sourcing the project on GitHub seriously changed how I organized the software (I created the libraries and examples of how to use them), and stretched my ideas of what a Git repo was for (e.g., Bill of Materials). It made me think of reusability of the code.

Sharing sends many messages

At work, Jessica and I discussed what Sharing Making says, and came up with these ideas:

  • The foreground message: “how to do what I did”. You’re giving people a recipe, that’s hopefully complete enough to be useful.
  • It’s a resource list: “Here are links to the sources I used to get where I am with this project”. It lets people find more detail and the people who created those details.
  • “I appreciate the work people put into the resources I used” – making a resource list gives kudos back to the authors.
  • “How I got here”. It’s a journal, showing your process of creation. Not just the recipe, but a guide to how to be a chef who creates recipes.  This is the big reason you want to share your project as you go rather than when it’s “finished”.
  • It shows authority: “Now I know how to do this.” “I’ve got chops”
  • Advertising that you’re a resource: “I’ve shared this much; ask me questions about problems you run into”
  • An advertisement for collaboration: “These are areas I’m interested in” “Contact me if you want to work together in an area”
  • Most importantly: if you only share the demo – what you did – you’re only saying “look at how great I am and you can’t be”; if you share how to duplicate the project, you’re saying “I’m nurturing the community”. I’ve seen how when people only post a photo or demo, the first comment on it is “So, where’s the source?”

So far, I’ve only written; I haven’t actually participated in a community

  • I’ve blogged, tweeted, youtubed, and githubbed, but I haven’t heard from anyone who’s used this info, and I haven’t offered changes to anyone else’s Open Source project – yet.
  • Everything I’ve said about “sharing” is just speculation at this point. I look forward to actually collaborating (in some way) with other people who are into music technology.
  • I need to “advertise” the project so people can find it. Once it’s more complete, I can put it up on the Arduino Blog, Sparkfun’s site, etc. I can also do more exercises to make the libraries I’ve created more useful.
  • Life is all about creating long-term, mutually-beneficial relationships. Linda says writing isn’t about one fantastic book; it’s about continually writing  wonderful new books for your growing audience. In the same way, Making isn’t about one cool project; it’s about building relationships to Make stuff that’s so much more wonderful than you can make alone.